What’s On Your Plate?

 

48.1 million Americans live in food insecure households, including 32.8 million adults and 15.3 million children. Many people oppose the food stamp program (SNAP) and have worked towards cutting a large portion of these people in food insecure households.  This is happening in a country that spent 967.9 billion dollars on national security in 2014. While national security is a valued part of American culture, the governing bodies also tend to give corporations tax cuts (over 628.6 billion dollars over 5 years) resulting from loopholes while they are willing to make budget cuts on important, life-saving programs like SNAP.  Today, you or someone you know could be facing hunger and the consequences of being underprivileged.

What is on your plate?

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With a phone in hand, this work was viewed by using a personalized app created via Unity.  The viewer would point their phone’s camera at the stovetop image, which would be printed in a book.  Through this action, the phone would display copious amounts of augmented reality food sitting on the stove for a few seconds.  Slowly, the food would disappear from view until there was nothing left.  While this happened, a popular news announcer would be talking about possible cuts on SNAP.  Envelopes stamped with “OVERDUE” and “LATE NOTICE” would flop onto the stove, signifying what it is like for people who cannot afford to feed themselves and their families.

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This work was part of a larger student project [IN]VISIBLE.

[IN]VISIBLE is a collection of augmented reality works of art that investigate a dichotomy of the visible and invisible. These works are viewable through a smartphone application that is used as a viewing device, each page loads a 3-Dimentional work of art with an accompanying project description along side. This project was organized by Christopher Manzione, including works by Patrick VanDuyne, Danilo Brandao, Joseph Strokusz, Elise Paulsen, Thomas Braun, Mike Salas, and Julia Guignard. More information about the smartphone application can be found at: www.christophermanzione.com/invisible